Research Abstracts and Articles

Contents:

1. “Relief of Asthma Symptoms with Dilutions of Progesterone” Russell R. Roby, J.D., M.D., and Dick Richardson, Ph.D., November 2001

2. “Prevention of Sinusitis Using Intranasal Influenzavirus Vaccine” Russell R. Roby, J. D., M.D., and Dick Richardson, Ph.D.

3. “Incidence of fungal spores at the homes of allergic patients in an agricultural community. I. A 12-month study in and out of doors.” M.R. Sneller, Ph.D., and R.R. Roby, M.D.

4. “Incidence of fungal spores at the homes of allergic patients in an agricultural community. II. Correlations of skin tests with mold frequency.” R.R. Roby, M.D., and M.R. Sneller, Ph.D.

5. “Incidence of fungal spores at the homes of allergic patients in an agricultural community. III. Associations with local crops.” M.R. Sneller, Ph.D., R.R. Roby, M.D. and L.M. Thurmond, B.S.

6. “Treatment of Common Gynecologic-Endocrinologic Symptoms by Allergy Management Procedures” C. R. Mabray, MD, M. L. Burditt, MD, T. L. Martin, MD, C. R. Jaynes, MD, and J. R. Hayes, MD

7. “Relief of Premenstrual Symptoms, Dysmenorrhea, and Contraceptive Tablet Intolerance”Joseph B. Miller, MD.

8. “NY Times review of Dr. Atkins’ Diet” July 7, 2002.

9. “Evidence of estrogen and progesterone hormone allergy” Russell R. Roby, Richard H. Richardson, Aristo Vojdani, January 17, 2006.


1. ABSTRACT: “Relief of Asthma Symptoms with Dilutions of Progesterone” Russell R. Roby, J.D., M.D., and Dick Richardson, Ph.D. November 2001

 

Background. Premenstrual asthma has been described in the literature. Several hormones were tested to see if any caused a change in symptoms of asthma. Progesterone was noted to have the greatest impact. Several dilutions of progesterone were used to relieve acute symptoms of asthma.

Methods. Between 1998 and 2001, we examined 82 adult patients who were diagnosed with acute asthma. Before any treatment, the patients were asked to evaluate the severity of their symptoms using a ten-point scale for shortness of breath “SOB” (ten being the most severe and zero indicating no symptoms at all). All patients were given dilutions of progesterone ranging from ten to the minus fifteenth to ten to the minus fortieth (intradermally or sublingually), and again asked to rate their symptoms from zero to ten. If their symptoms increased a weaker dilution was used. If there was slight change or no change a stronger dilution was used. Results. Statistical significance of patient response was highly significant (p<4X10-17). Following the treatment, 74 of the 82 patients (90%) reported significant decline in shortness of breath. Six reported no change and one reported an increase of one point. On the ten-point scale, the average symptomatic relief was 3.1 points. Response change relative to maximum patient symptom score averaged 56.8% reduction in symptoms. The single individual experienced an increase of one-unit distress (5 to 6) and was not affected by a weaker dilution. Conclusions. Asthma symptoms can be reduced significantly by treatment with dilutions of progesterone. Dilutions of progesterone are an effective treatment for the symptoms of female asthma patients. An increase in symptoms at one dilution followed by reversal using a weaker dilution is consistent with our hypothesis that symptoms result from allergic reactions to progesterone. Research is continuing to obtain objective evidence of these rapid changes using electroencephalograms. Further testing is now being done in four centers using blind and control methods. Initial tests in a second center over the last five months indicate similar results.


2. ABSTRACT: “Prevention of Sinusitis Using Intranasal Influenzavirus Vaccine” Russell R. Roby, J. D., M.D., and Dick Richardson, Ph.D. Presented at the International Symposium “New Concepts and Clinical Applications of recent Advances in Allergy, Immunology and Infectious Diseases.” Giardini Naxos, ME, Italy. June 21 -23, 2001

 

Background. Intranasal influenza virus vaccine has been shown to reduce episodes of febrile otitis media by 30 percent. We conducted a placebo-controlled trial of intranasal influenza virus vaccine in adults with chronic sinusitis.

Methods. Twenty eight subjects with four or more episodes of sinusitis in the previous twelve month period received two doses of intranasal vaccine for one week. Another eleven subjects were given the same nose spray without the vaccine. Twelve months after the nasal spray was administered the number of episodes of sinusitis was recorded.

Results. The placebo-controlled group (n+11) had no change in sinusitis frequency from 1999 to 2000 (-3%,ns) while the experimental group (n=28) exhibited a 76% reduction of sinusitis from 1999 to 2000 (highly significant, p<0.0001, either by the t-test using arcsine transformed percentages or by Wilcoxson Rank Sum Test, experimental vs. control).

Conclusion. An intranasal influenza virus vaccine was effective in reducing episodes of sinusitis.


3. Annals of Allergy, Volume 43, Number 4, p225-228, 1979

 

Incidence of fungal spores at the homes of allergic patients in an agricultural community.
I. A 12-month study in and out of doors.
M.R. Sneller, Ph.D., and R.R. Roby, M.D.

Abstract: A 12-month survey of the fungal spores in and out of homes of 145 allergic patients, in an agricultural community was conducted. More than 6,100 colonies were recovered and 33 genera identified from November, 1977, through October, 1978. Cladosporium was the most common genus identified and was recovered from 90% of the homes. Peak Cladosporium counts were observed during November through January, with another peak in March. Penicillium and Alternaria were recovered from 57% and 33% of the homes respectively. Relationships were observed between minimum daily temperature and indoor and outdoor Cladosporium and Mycelia sterilia counts. The relationship between sporulation of fungi and other environmental factors is discussed.

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4. Annals of Allergy, Volume 43, Number 5, p286-288, 1979

 

Incidence of fungal spores at the homes of allergic patients in an agricultural community.
II. Correlations of skin tests with mold frequency.
R.R. Roby, M.D., and M.R. Sneller, Ph.D.

Abstract: A mold survey in and out of the homes of 145 allergy patients was conducted over the course of a year and frequency of mold recovery was correlated with skin test reactivity in 131 of these patients. The highest percentage correlation with positive skin test and finding mold in the home was with Cladosporium, Penicillium and Alternaria, while Helminthosporium, Fusarium, Aureobasidium (Pullularia) and Mucor each had correlations of one percent or less. The 0-10 age group was the most skin test reactive to molds in general while the over-50 age group was the least reactive. The percentage of patients sensitive to Alternaria also responding to other mold antigens was the highest with Helminthosporium. Since Helminthosporium was rarely recovered in this survey the data suggest that cross reactivity and not dual reactivity between Alternaria and Helminthosporium is occurring.

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5. Annals of Allergy, Volume 43, Number 6, p352-355, 1979

 

Incidence of fungal spores at the homes of allergic patients in an agricultural community.
III. Associations with local crops.
M.R. Sneller, Ph.D., R.R. Roby, MD. and L.M. Thurmond, B.S.

Abstract: A predominantly agricultural community in California was surveyed for prevalent fungal spores during a 12-month period. Alternaria, Macrosporium and Stemphylium were recovered during asparagus and strawberry harvesting times year-round. Fusarium and Botrytis were less frequently associated with the strawberry harvest and were recovered only during the first quarter of the year. Epicoccum was recovered in the north end of the Salinas valley in low numbers throughout the year and was strongly associated with the strawberry and artichoke harvest. Aureobasidium (Pullularia) recovery occurred in different locations according to season, correlating somewhat with the cabbage harvest as well as with the harvest of strawberries. Recovery of the pigmented yeasts showed strong correlation with the local growing season for lettuce. Cladosporium was prevalent year-round but did not appear to be significantly affected by changing agricultural conditions. These data have permitted the predictability of mold aeroallergens with medical applications.

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6. Obstetrics & Gynecology Vol. 59, No. 5, May 1982

 

Treatment of Common Gynecologic-Endocrinologic Symptoms by Allergy Management Procedures
C. R. Mabray, MD, M. L. Burditt, MD, T. L. Martin, MD, C. R. Jaynes, MD, and J. R. Hayes, MD

Abstract: The technique of managing allergies by optimum-dose (provocative neutralization) testing and treatment using aqueous progesterone has been studied in 132 women having progesterone-related symptoms due to the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, or exogenous hormone administration. When extremely small doses of progesterone (0.0016 mg or below, up to a maximum of 2.5 mg) were administered following determination of specific dose requirement by skin testing, startlingly rapid and effective clearing of symptoms was observed. With these individualized doses, symptoms cleared completely or almost completely within 30 minutes in the majority of patients.

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7. JOURNAL OF THE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE STATE OF ALABAMA, Vol 44, August 1974, Number 2

 

Relief of Premenstrual Symptoms, Dysmenorrhea, and Contraceptive Tablet Intolerance
Joseph B. Miller, MD.

Abstract: A new method of providing rapid relief of progesterone-related symptoms is based on the administration of progesterone injections in a dosage far smaller than in conventional usage. A hundredth, a thousandth or a ten thousandth of a milligram of progesterone may give far superior, more rapid and more dependable relief than 100-200 mgm. The exact dose is usually dramatically effective within 20 minutes; a dose slightly stronger or weaker than this is often ineffective, and may even aggravate symptoms. The proper dose can be determined precisely for each patient by a simple intradermal test.

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8. NY Times, July 7, 2002, Sunday.

 

“NY Times review of Dr. Atkins’ Diet”
By Gary Taubes, Magazine Desk

Introduction: If the members of the American medical establishment were to have a collective “find yourself standing naked in Times Square type” nightmare, this might be it. They spend 30 years ridiculing Robert Atkins, author of the phenomenally-best-selling “Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution” and “Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution,” accusing the Manhattan doctor of quackery and fraud, only to discover that the unrepentant Atkins was right all along. Or maybe it’s this: they find that their very own dietary recommendations — eat less fat and more carbohydrates — are the cause of the rampaging epidemic of obesity in America. Or, just possibly this: they find out both of the above are true.

Click here for an Acrobat pdf of this entire article.


9. Roby Institute, January 17, 2006

 

“Evidence of estrogen and progesterone hormone allergy”
By Russell R. Roby, Richard H. Richardson, Aristo Vojdani

Citation: Roby RR, Richardson RH, Vojdani A. Hormone allergy. Am J Reprod Immunol 2006; 55:307–313

Introduction: Some women with menstrual cycle disorders like asthma and migraine headaches may be experiencing allergies to their own estrogen and progesterone hormones, Texas researchers have discovered.
Russell Roby, M.D., director of the Roby Institute, Dr. Dick Richardson, professor at The University of Texas at Austin, and Dr. Aristo Vojdani, of Immunosciences Lab, Inc. in California, found that female patients who experienced health changes during their menstrual cycle had higher levels of IgE antibodies against progesterone and estrogen than control subjects. An increase in IgE antibodies is typically associated with allergic response.
The researchers published their findings in the March 27 issue of the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology.

Click here for an Acrobat pdf of this entire article.

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